Protection of Occupant

Challenge

For homeowners unable to seek shelter during natural disasters, special accommodation may need to be integrated into the home to allow the resident to shelter in place. For example, a person with limited mobility in a rural area may have more trouble accessing a community tornado shelter.

Opportunity & Response

Federal entities such as FEMA offer guidance for constructing in-home shelters. Though these shelters can add cost and complication to construction, they may be particularly important for certain homeowners. There are also multiple assistance programs that provide loans and grants to assist in purchasing or building shelters in high-risk areas.

Implementation

Protection of Asset

Challenge

Even in areas not directly hit by storms or other natural disasters, home damage can occur, displacing residents from homes. For example, high winds from a tornado may not destroy a home but may damage roofing and cause water infiltration into the home.

Opportunity & Response

The insurance industry provides incentives for mitigation from storm events. For example, certification from the FORTIFIED Home program by the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS) can lower insurance premiums. These reductions in monthly premiums can decrease or offset the increased cost of construction.

Implementation

Jean Lafitte

Chipola Street

Preserving Neighborhoods Post-Disaster

Challenge

Following natural disasters such as hurricanes or tornadoes, the character of neighborhoods can change as developers come in and buy up properties. This can be particularly treacherous in minority and low-income neighborhoods, as residents are displaced from their communities, jobs, schools, and services.

Opportunity & Response

Building back more durable homes after a storm event will strengthen the resilience of the neighborhood and cut down on recovery time after future weather events.

Implementation

Jean Lafitte